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ADHD and Bupropion

Read more about Bupropion.

Overview

Bupropion is atypical antidepressant. Sold under the brand names Wellbutrin and Zyban, bupropion has been shown to have a moderate effect in reducing the symptoms of ADHD.

Effect of Bupropion on ADHD

Bupropion increases the amount of dopamine and norepinephrine in the body by slowing the reuptake of neurotransmitters.

Research Evidence on Bupropion

Controlled studies have found the use of buproprion to be effective in reducing the symptoms of ADHD in both children and adults.1 Buproprion may also be effective for treating individuals with ADHD and bipolar disease. Buproprion may also be a good choice for individuals suffering for anxiety or depression.2

How to Use Bupropion

Bupropion comes in once and twice a day dosages. One study showed success with a starting dose of 37.5 mg titrating up to 300 mg in children and 450 mg in adults over the course of three to four days.3

Types of Professionals That Would Be Involved with This Treatment

Medical practitioners and psychiatrists

Side Effects and Warnings

#What are the precautions when taking this medicine?

• You may have certain heart tests before starting this medicine. Talk with healthcare provider.

• If you are 65 or older, use this medicine with caution. You could have more side effects.

• If you are allergic to tartrazine, talk with healthcare provider. Some products contain tartrazine.

• Do not use Zyban® and Wellbutrin® together. They are the same medicine.

• If you have been taking this medicine for several weeks, talk with healthcare provider before stopping. You may want to gradually withdraw this medicine.

• If you abuse alcohol or cocaine, talk with healthcare provider.

• If you have heart disease, talk with healthcare provider.

• If you have kidney disease, talk with healthcare provider.

• If you have liver disease, talk with healthcare provider.

• Check medicines with healthcare provider. This medicine may not mix well with other medicines.

• You may not be alert. Avoid driving, doing other tasks or activities until you see how this medicine affects you.

• Avoid alcohol (includes wine, beer, and liquor) or other medicines and natural products that slow your actions and reactions.

• Tell healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant.

• Tell healthcare provider if you are breast-feeding.

#What are some possible side effects of this medicine?

• Feeling lightheaded, sleepy, having blurred vision, or a change in thinking clearly. Avoid driving, doing other tasks or activities that require you to be alert or have clear vision until you see how this medicine affects you.

• Long-acting tablet shell in the stool.

• Hot flashes. Wearing layers of clothes or summer clothes and cool environment may help.

• Headache.

• Belly pain.

• Shakiness.

• Nervous and excitable.

• Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

• Constipation. More liquids, regular exercise, or a fiber-containing diet may help. Talk with healthcare provider about a stool softener or laxative.

• Dry mouth. Frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

• Inability to sleep.

• Abnormal taste. This is usually reversible.

• Not hungry.

• Severe allergic reactions can rarely occur.

#Reasons to call healthcare provider immediately

• If you suspect an overdose, call your local poison control center or emergency department immediately.

• Signs of a life-threatening reaction. These include wheezing; chest tightness; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; fits; or swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat.

• Signs or symptoms of depression, suicidal thoughts, nervousness, emotional ups and downs, abnormal thinking, anxiety, or lack of interest in life.

• Significant change in thinking clearly and logically.

• Fast heartbeat.

• Severe headache.

• Very nervous and excitable.

• If seizures are new or worse after starting medicine.

• Any rash.

• No improvement in condition or feeling worse.

References

  1. Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D., Attention Deficit Disorder: The Unfocused Mind in Children and Adults, (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2005): 268.
  2. “Medication Management for Adults with ADHD,” Attention Deficit Disorder Resources, www.help4adhd.org, http://www.addresources.org/articleadhdmedication_chadd.php
  3. Medication Management for Adults with ADHD,” Attention Deficit Disorder Resources, www.help4adhd.org, http://www.addresources.org/articleadhdmedication_chadd.php

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