Obesity is a rapidly growing epidemic in the United States. There are so many factors contributing to obesity, although some are more prominent than others. Many possible solutions have been proposed to help halt the increase in obesity rates, one being a proposed soda tax. People in the United States consume high amounts of sugary, sweetened beverages, and these only contribute to poor health statues. There are both pros and cons to this tax, and many studies have been conducted to see if a tax would really impact obesity in the United States. The proposed tax would tax buyers on soda can purchases.

This “soda tax” would most likely consist of a 18% tax to the price of soda beverages at time of purchase. With a soda tax, it is the hope that soda will be consumed in less amounts. It has been estimated that once a soda tax has been implemented, sweetened beverages will decrease in consumption by approximately 24%. As a result, the average caloric intake of soda from sweetened beverages should decrease as well.

Pros: Many people are pro-soda tax as they think it will help deter people from purchasing sugary filled drinks. Revenues from the “soda tax” can be used to help implement obesity intervention programs, making the proposed taxation on soda a comprehensive solution to the obesity epidemic. By imposing a tax when purchasing sugary beverages, consumers will most likely change their drink option to water or a more preferable liquid that has little to no impact on their weight if for nothing else but to save money. Opting to drink water over sugary beverages could help lower the obesity epidemic.

Cons: The other side of the arguments says that a tax on soda wouldn’t make a big enough impact to curb obesity rates. People on this side of the argument say that there are many factors contributing to obesity, and a tax on soda isn’t the cure. The tax would be minimal, so little that it would inhibit consumers from purchasing their can of soda over a bottle of water or a fresh juice. Larger steps need to be taken to combat obesity in the United States. A tax just wouldn’t do it.

There are two side to the argument, both with valid reasonings. It’s up to you to develop your own take on the proposed tax, but one thing is for sure: Soda is full of sugar, and should be avoided regardless of a tax. We’d love to hear your take on the soda tax. Be sure to comment below and let us know what you think!

 

Resources:

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503544_162-5009316-503544.html

http://www.ajc.com/opinion/pro-con-is-a-438123.html

http://ronideutch.blogspot.com/2010/04/pros-and-cons-of-soda-taxes.html

 http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/12/16/soda-tax-plan-sparks-a-debate/

 

Tagged with:
 

One Response to Soda Tax – The Cure to Obesity?

  1. george simpson says:

    A tax on sugar hits poor people and the rich just carry on as they were before. If they want to curb sugar intake surely it would make more sense to reduce the levels in soft drinks.Fat people will still consume things which contain fat and other harmful products like beer. Education and less in products is the answer. Otherwise you have to tax sugar, salt, fat and make life impossible for the poor.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>