Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Usage

Written by ritasharma.

The basic premise underlying CBT, whether it is conducted with an individual, family, couple or in a group, is that thoughts, feelings and behaviors are inter-related, so altering one can help to alleviate difficulties in another. For instance, changing negative thoughts about oneself can lead to less sadness and anxiety, and more willingness to try new activities and work on improving relationships.

Common Treatment Strategies

There are numerous techniques used in CBT, so the list below is by no means exhaustive. Depending on the needs of the particular client, therapy is likely to involve some of the following:8

Responses to unhealthy thinking:

'Cognitive restructuring' involves trying to re-evaluate the negative thinking patterns that maintain distorted beliefs about oneself, the world, and relating to others. For instance, a person with social phobia could be taught to challenge his or her assumption that social rejection is inevitable.

Strategies to promote more effective problem solving and decision-making are emphad.

'Mindfulness' techniques help clients gain some distance from their negative thinking so they can recognize that thoughts do not have to determine behaviors.

Responses to unhealthy behaviors:

Clients are taught how to gradually start to re-enter situations they have been avoiding (e.g., because of fear in anxiety disorders, or low motivation in depression). This is not done in a coercive way; instead, clients learn how to gain a sense of control and predictability in situations that previously seemed overwhelming.

Activities that provide a sense of pleasure or mastery are planned to promote a more enjoyable and fulfilling life

Training in new skills may be provided, such as how to communicate more effectively, be assertive, or enhance social interactions.

Responses to painful feelings:

Clients are sometimes taught how to work on accepting or tolerating painful emotions, and sometimes taught how to try to change those emotions in the moment.

Relaxation exercises are often included to help reduce overall stress.

Strategies to manage extreme emotional reactions are taught, such as ways to deal with intense anger or urges to harm oneself.

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Usages

Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) on Depression

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) works to treat depression by changing an individual’s faulty information processing and negative belief systems1. CBT views depression as rooted in unhealthy...

Read more about Depression and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) on Generalized Anxiety Disorder

The therapist seeks in a variety of ways to produce cognitive change—change in an individual’s thinking and belief system—in order to bring about lasting emotional and behavioral change.

Controlled...

Read more about Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT).

Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) on Panic Disorder

The therapist seeks in a variety of ways to produce cognitive change—change in an individual’s thinking and belief system—in order to bring about lasting emotional and behavioral change.

Controlled...

Read more about Panic Disorder and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT).

Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) on ADHD

CBT has been shown to be effective at reducing the symptoms of ADHD in both children and adults. In children, CBT can motivate a child to calm down enough to cope with school and other challenges. In...

Read more about ADHD and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT).

 
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