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Allergic Rhinitis Contributions by ColleenO

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For more information, see the section, "What to Expect During an Acupuncture Treatment," in the acupuncture article.

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Acupuncture may be practiced by a variety of professionals, and licensure laws in the United States vary by state. Look for a licensed acupuncturist ("L.Ac."). Other health professionals such as naturopaths, chiropractors and physicians might also use acupuncture as part of their practice.

For more information, see "How to Choose a Qualified Acupuncturist" in the acupuncture article.

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Immunotherapy (known as "allergy shots") is a common treatment for allergy-related conditions such as allergic rhinitis. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) and enzyme potentiated desensitization (EPD) are two potentially effective alternatives to conventional immunotherapy.

Acupuncture, used alone or in combination with Chinese herbs, may also be effective for treating allergic rhinitis.

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The most effective way to treat allergic rhinitis is to avoid the allergen(s) responsible for triggering the symptoms. Since this can be difficult or impossible, other treatments are available.

Conventional medicine offers several approaches to treating allergic rhinitis:

  • Corticosteroids, which can be sprayed directly into the nasal passages, reduce the inflammation associated with allergic rhinitis. They are the first line of treatment for allergic rhinitis.
  • Immunotherapy, known more commonly as allergy shots, is used to retrain the immune system to react less dramatically to specific allergens. Immunotherapy is recommended for people who develop strong side effects to allergy medicines, don't respond to allergy medicines, and/or can't avoid frequent exposure to allergens.
  • Antihistamines, mast cell stabilizers, and leukotrine leukotriene inhibitors come in pill, syrup, or topical (nasal spray) forms, and block the release of histamine and other chemicals that trigger some of the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.
  • Decongestants can be taken in pill or nasal spray form to reduce or eliminate the congestion associated with allergic rhinitis. Saline nasal sprays are low-tech decongestants.
  • Antihistamine/decongestant combinations are available by prescription.
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Saline nasal sprays, such as Salinex, are simple decongestants. They contain a saltwater solution to rinse your nose and help relieve mild congestion, loosen mucus, and prevent crusting. Though saline sprays can be useful for relieving symptoms of allergic rhinitis and have no side effects, saline can't prevent allergy symptoms from occurring, as some other allergy treatments can. (Preventive treatments include allergy shots [immunotherapy], antihistamines, mast cell stabilizers, and leukotriene inhibitors, as well as some natural treatments.)

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The mucus that produces congestion is part of the immune system's inflammatory response to allergens. Decongestants work by shrinking the tissues and blood vessels that have become inflamed, thereby reducing congestion.

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The most effective way to treat allergic rhinitis is to avoid the allergen(s) responsible for triggering the symptoms. Since this can be difficult or impossible, other treatments are available.

Conventional medicine offers several approaches to treating allergic rhinitis:

  • Corticosteroids, which can be sprayed directly into the nasal passages, reduce the inflammation associated with allergic rhinitis. They are the first line of treatment for allergic rhinitis.
  • Immunotherapy, known more commonly as allergy shots, is used to retrain the immune system to react less dramatically to specific allergens. Immunotherapy is recommended for people who develop strong side effects to allergy medicines, don't respond to allergy medicines, and/or can't avoid frequent exposure to allergens.
  • Antihistamines and , mast cell stabilizers, and leukotriene inhibitors come in pill, syrup, or topical (nasal spray) forms, and block the release of histamine and other substances chemicals that trigger some of the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.
  • Decongestants can be taken in pill or nasal spray form to reduce or eliminate the congestion associated with allergic rhinitis. Saline nasal sprays are low-tech decongestants.
  • Antihistamine/decongestant combinations are available by prescription.
... (more)

Singulair works by decreasing how many leukotrienes (chemicals) the body creates in response to an allergen, thereby preventing symptoms from developing.

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Like the mast cell stabilizers, leukotrine inhibitors are used to prevent some of the symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Montelukast (Singulair) is a common leukotrine inhibitor.

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Singulair works by decreasing how many leukotrienes (chemicals) the body creates in response to an allergen, thereby preventing symptoms from developing.

... (more)

The most effective way to treat allergic rhinitis is to avoid the allergen(s) responsible for triggering the symptoms. Since this can be difficult or impossible, other treatments are available.

Conventional medicine offers several approaches to treating allergic rhinitis:

  • Corticosteroids, which can be sprayed directly into the nasal passages, reduce the inflammation associated with allergic rhinitis. They are the first line of treatment for allergic rhinitis.
  • Immunotherapy, known more commonly as allergy shots, is used to retrain the immune system to react less dramatically to specific allergens. Immunotherapy is recommended for people who develop strong side effects to allergy medicines, don't respond to allergy medicines, and/or can't avoid frequent exposure to allergens.
  • Antihistamines, mast cell stabilizers, and leukotriene inhibitors come in pill, syrup, or topical (nasal spray) forms, and block the release of histamine and other chemicals that trigger some of the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.
  • Decongestants can be taken in pill or nasal spray form to reduce or eliminate the congestion associated with allergic rhinitis. Saline nasal sprays are low-tech decongestants.
  • Antihistamine/decongestant combinations are available by prescription.
... (more)

Decongestants help to narrow the blood vessels, which results in a clearing of nasal congestion. Antihistamines help stop or reduce the production of histamine, a chemical that is released when the immune system reacts to an allergen.

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Decongestants and antihistamines complement each other well in allergic rhinitis treatment and are combined in some prescription medicines, including:

  • Fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine (Allegra-D)
  • Acrivastine and pseudoephedrine (Semprex-D)
  • Azatadine and pseudoephedrine (Trinalin)
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Decongestants help to narrow the blood vessels, which results in a clearing of nasal congestion. Antihistamines help stop or reduce the production of histamine, a chemical that is released when the immune system reacts to an allergen.

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Antihistamines are a common treatment for allergic conditions such as allergic rhinitis. They come in prescription and over-the-counter forms.

The following antihistamines are available over-the-counter, without a prescription. Many of these are older (first-generation) antihistamines. (Note: First-generation antihistamines can cause drowsiness.)

  • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
  • Chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton)
  • Brompheniramine (Dimetane)
  • Dexbrompheniramine and pseudoephedrine (Drixoral)
  • Clemastine (Tavist)
  • Chlorpheniramine and phenylpropanolamine (Triaminic Allergy)

Several second-generation antihistamines are also available over the counter. (Note: Second-generation antihistamines are non-sedating.)

  • Loratadine (Claritin)
  • Cetirizine hydrochloride (Zyrtec)

Common prescription antihistamines include:

  • Fexofenadine (Allegra)
  • Desloratadine (Clarinex)
  • Levocetirizine (Xyzal)

Nasal antihistamine sprays are also available, such as azelastine (Astelin).

... (more)

Antihistamines are a common treatment for allergic conditions such as allergic rhinitis. They come in prescription and over-the-counter forms.

The following antihistamines are available over-the-counter, without a prescription. Many of these are older (first-generation) antihistamines. (Note: First-generation antihistamines can cause drowsiness.)

  • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
  • Chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton)
  • Brompheniramine (Dimetane)
  • Dexbrompheniramine and pseudoephedrine (Drixoral)
  • Clemastine (Tavist)
  • Chlorpheniramine and phenylpropanolamine (Triaminic Allergy)

Several second-generation antihistamines are also available over the counter. (Note: Second-generation antihistamines are non-sedating.)

  • Loratadine (Claritin)
  • Cetirizine hydrochloride (Zyrtec)

Common prescription antihistamines include:

  • Fexofenadine (Allegra)
  • Desloratadine (Clarinex)
  • Levocetirizine (Xyzal)

Nasal antihistamine sprays are also available, such as azelastine (Astelin).

... (more)

The most effective way to treat allergic rhinitis is to avoid the allergen(s) responsible for triggering the symptoms. Since this can be difficult or impossible, other treatments are available.

Conventional medicine offers several approaches to treating allergic rhinitis:

  • Corticosteroids, which can be sprayed directly into the nasal passages, reduce the inflammation associated with allergic rhinitis. They are the first line of treatment for allergic rhinitis.
  • Immunotherapy, known more commonly as allergy shots, is used to retrain the immune system to react less dramatically to specific allergens. Immunotherapy is recommended for people who develop strong side effects to allergy medicines, don't respond to allergy medicines, and/or can't avoid frequent exposure to allergens.
  • Antihistamines, mast cell stabilizers, and leukotriene inhibitors come in pill, syrup, or topical (nasal spray) forms, and block the release of histamines histamine and other chemicals that trigger some of the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.
  • Corticosteroids, which can be sprayed directly into the nasal passages, reduce the inflammation associated with allergic rhinitis.
  • Decongestants can be taken in pill or nasal spray form to reduce or eliminate the congestion associated with allergic rhinitis. Saline nasal sprays are low-tech decongestants.
  • Antihistamine/decongestant combinations are available by prescription.
... (more)

Once a definite diagnosis of allergic rhinitis is made, the first-line treatment of choice is nasal corticosteroid spray. Nasal (topical) corticosteroids for allergic rhinitis come in the form of nasal sprays that decrease swelling in the nasal passages.

Common names include:

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Antihistamines are a common treatment for allergic conditions such as allergic rhinitis. They come in prescription and over-the-counter forms.

The following antihistamines are available over-the-counter, without a prescription. Many of these are older (first-generation) antihistamines. (Note: First-generation antihistamines can cause drowsiness.)

  • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
  • Chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton)
  • Brompheniramine (Dimetane)
  • Dexbrompheniramine and pseudoephedrine (Drixoral)
  • Clemastine (Tavist)
  • Chlorpheniramine and phenylpropanolamine (Triaminic Allergy)

Several second-generation antihistamines are also available over the counter. (Note: Second-generation antihistamines are non-sedating.)

  • Loratadine (Claritin)
  • Cetirizine hydrochloride (Zyrtec)

Common prescription antihistamines include:

  • Fexofenadine (Allegra)
  • Desloratadine (Clarinex)
  • Levocetirizine (Xyzal)

Nasal antihistamine sprays are also available, such as azelastine (Astelin).

... (more)

Experiences

Shared experience with Allergic Rhinitis and Antihistamines 8 years ago

Before I figured out how to manage my seasonal allergies naturally, over-the-counter antihistamines were my saving grace. They worked best for me if I took them when I first noticed symptoms. Otherwise, my symptoms would escalate and it would take hours for the antihistamine to "catch up" with my reaction. While they're helpful, I don't recommend them whole-heartedly because more natural options can work well if implemented over time, and they have fewer side effects.

Before I figured out how to manage my seasonal allergies naturally, over-the-counter antihistamines were my saving grace. They worked best for me if I took them when I first noticed symptoms....

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Shared experience with Allergic Rhinitis and Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) 8 years ago

My allergic rhinitis has been less problematic since I started taking fish oil supplements every day. Also, I have a friend who virtually eliminated her seasonal allergies, which had plagued her most of her life, by taking fish oil supplements and eating more omega-3 rich foods, like salmon.

My allergic rhinitis has been less problematic since I started taking fish oil supplements every day. Also, I have a friend who virtually eliminated her seasonal allergies, which had plagued her most...

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