Share

Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and Angina Contributions by ColleenO

Article Revisions

American Lung Association website. Available at: http://www.lungusa.org/. Accessed July 15, 2008.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/. Accessed July 15, 2008.

National Cancer Institute website. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/. Accessed July 15, 2008.

3/25/2008 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php : Parkes G, Greenhalgh T, Griffin M, Dent R. Effect on smoking quit rate of telling patients their lung age: the Step2quit randomised controlled trial. BMJ. 2008;336:598-600.

7/6/2009 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php : Myung SK, McDonnell DD, Kazinets G, Seo HG, Moskowitz JM. Effects of Web- and computer-based smoking cessation programs: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Arch Intern Med. 2009;169:929-937.

... (more)

A number of different health professionals may have different methods and products that can support you in quitting smoking.

  • MD
  • Naturopathic doctor
  • Acupuncturist
  • Herbalist
  • Nutritionist
  • Health coach
... (more)

There are a number of ways to quit smoking. For more information and tips, see the Smoking Cessation article.

You don't have to quit alone. In fact, quitting with a friend or loved one can increase both of your chances for success.

... (more)

Enter section content...

Because smoking is one of the major lifestyle contributors to the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and angina, quitting can be an important part of preventing and treating the disease.

... (more)

Smoking is a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and angina. Smoking damages your blood vessels, reduces the amount of oxygen in your blood, and forces your heart to work harder. The good news is that there are a variety of products and methods available to help you quit.

... (more)

Because smoking is one of the major lifestyle contributors to the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and angina, quitting can be an important part of preventing and treating the disease.

... (more)

In addition to consulting with your doctor, consider making an appointment with a certified athletic trainer to help you develop a safe, effective, and enjoyable exercise program. You can find a trainer at a local gym or through a referral from your doctor or a friend. Make sure this person understands your goals and health condition and can help you maintain an exercise program that you will enjoy and stick with.

If you are looking for other forms of movement, consider consulting someone like a yoga therapist, qi gong or tai chi instructor.

... (more)

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine website. Available at: http://www.sportsmed.org/tabs/Index.aspx . Accessed September 4, 2008.

Exercise: how to get started. American Academy of Family Physicians website. Available at: http://www.aafp.org/afp/20061215/2095ph.html . Published December 2006. Accessed September 4, 2008.

Health and fitness tips. American Council on Exercise website. Available at: http://www.acefitness.org/healthandfitnesstips/default.aspx . Accessed September 4, 2008.

Mayo Clinic. Stretching: focus on flexibility. Mayo Clinic website. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/stretching/hq01447. Updated February 21, 2010. Accessed May 18, 2010.

... (more)

In addition to consulting with your doctor, consider making an appointment with a certified athletic trainer to help you develop a safe, effective, and enjoyable exercise program. You can find a trainer at a local gym or through a referral from your doctor or a friend. Make sure this person understands your goals and health condition and can help you maintain an exercise program that you will enjoy and stick with.

If you are looking for other forms of movement, consider consulting someone like a yoga therapist, qi gong or tai chi instructor.

... (more)

To offer you the full range of benefits, your exercise program should include the major categories of exercise--aerobic (cardiovascular exercise), strength training (resistance exercises), and flexibility (stretching exercise). Within all of these major categories of exercise, there are a number of different options.

See the Exercise article for more information and tips on starting a regular exercise program.

... (more)

Regular exercise might help you feel better and provides numerous other benefits. Moderate exercise is recommended (at least 3-4 times a week for 30 minutes).

Note: If you already have CAD, talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise program.

... (more)

Exercise has a number of benefits for people with coronary arterdy disease (CAD) and angina. Exercise strengthens the heart muscle, helps lower blood pressure, supports weight management, and helps reduce stress.

... (more)

What is typically called a "heart-healthy diet" involves limiting sodium, certain types of fat, and cholesterol, while emphasizing more healthful foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and lean meats.

Because of the link between diabetes and heart disease, some experts consider a low-glycemic diet or low-carbohydrate diet to be the most heart-healthy option. To find what works best for you, talk with your doctor, investigate your options, and experiment.

... (more)

There are several ways you can modify your lifestyle to help manage the symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD) and angina. (For more information on lifestyle changes for CAD and angina, click here.) Consider the following:

  • Smoking damages your blood vessels, reduces the amount of oxygen in your blood, and forces your heart to work harder. All of these things make CAD and angina worse. If you smoke, consider quitting. While it can be very difficult, there are many ways to quit smoking. Seek support from loved ones and health professionals.
  • Regular exercise might help you feel better and provides numerous other benefits. Exercise will strengthen the heart muscle, help lower blood pressure, support weight management, and help reduce stress. Moderate exercise is recommended (at least 3-4 times a week for 30 minutes). See the exercise article for more information and tips on starting a regular exercise program. Note: If you already have CAD, talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise program.

Chelation therapy is a controversial treatment that has been suggested as an alternative to surgical treatments for CAD and angina. When performed correctly by a qualified practitioner, it is relatively harmless, though it might also offer few or no benefits.

Note: Coronary artery disease (CAD) and angina are serious diseases that absolutely require conventional medical evaluation and supervision. No one should self-treat for CAD or angina. However, lifestyle modification and alternative treatments may provide a useful adjunct to standard medical care when monitored by an appropriate healthcare professional.

... (more)

There are several ways you can modify your lifestyle to help manage the symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD) and angina. (For more information on lifestyle changes for CAD and angina, click here.) Consider the following:

  • Smoking damages your blood vessels, reduces the amount of oxygen in your blood, and forces your heart to work harder. All of these things make CAD and angina worse. If you smoke, consider quitting. While it can be very difficult, there are many ways to quit smoking. Seek support from loved ones and health professionals.
  • Regular exercise might help you feel better and provides numerous other benefits. Exercise will strengthen the heart muscle, help lower blood pressure, support weight management, and help reduce stress. Moderate exercise is recommended (at least 3-4 times a week for 30 minutes). See the exercise article for more information and tips on starting a regular exercise program. Note: If you already have CAD, talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise program.

Chelation therapy is a controversial treatment that has been suggested as an alternative to surgical treatments for CAD and angina. When performed correctly by a qualified practitioner, it is relatively harmless, though it might also offer few or no benefits.

Note: Coronary artery disease (CAD) and angina are serious diseases that absolutely require conventional medical evaluation and supervision. No one should self-treat for CAD or angina. However, lifestyle modification and alternative treatments may provide a useful adjunct to standard medical care when monitored by an appropriate healthcare professional.

... (more)

Beta blockers are intended to prevent anginal attacks or heart attacks. They do this by helping to slow the heart rate and reduce blood pressure, especially during exercise.

... (more)

What is typically called a "heart-healthy diet" involves limiting sodium, certain types of fat, and cholesterol, while emphasizing more healthful foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and lean meats.

Because of the link between diabetes and heart disease, some experts consider a low-glycemic diet][1] or [ low-carbohydrate diet to be the most heart-healthy option. To find what works best for you, talk with your doctor, investigate your options, and experiment.

... (more)

American Dietetic Association. Nutrition Care Manual. American Dietetic Association website. Available at: http://nutritioncaremanual.org . Accessed December 8, 2009.

American Heart Association website. Available at: http://www.americanheart.org . Accessed January 12, 2006.

Shield J, Mullen MC. Patient education materials. Supplement to the Manual of Clinical Dietetics . 3rd ed. Chicago, IL: American Dietetic Association; 2001.

... (more)

It can be challenging to alter your diet, especially if you are trying to make big changes. Consider working with a nutritionist or dietitian to create a customized eating plan that is most likely to fit you and your life. Your doctor or naturopath may also have resources on heart-healthy eating.

... (more)

This diet involves limiting certain foods (those that are high in cholesterol, sodium, and some fats) and emphasizing others, such as whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, and lean meats. For more details and tips, see the full article on Heart-Healthy Diet.

... (more)