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Viral Hepatitis Contributions by ColleenO

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The following dietary guidelines1 are recommended for people with chronic hepatitis:

  • Consume more cruciferous vegetables: In addition to containing many vitamins and minerals, these vegetables have phytochemicals that assist the body in its detoxification processes. Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower, kale, collard greens, and turnips, among many others. Eat them raw or lightly cooked to maintain their health properties.
  • Consume more fruit: Like cruciferous vegetables, many fruits contain a variety of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals that help the liver detoxify. Focus especially on nutrient-dense berries (blueberries, cranberries, etc.), citrus fruits (oranges, lemons, etc.) as well as melons, mangoes and peaches. As with vegetables, fruits lose some of their health properties in cooking, so aim for more fresh or lightly cooked fruits.
  • Avoid or limit consumption of foods that contain substances that block detoxification: These foods include grapefruit (naringenin), hot peppers (capsaicin), onions (quercetin), and clove oil (eugenol).
  • Eat enough protein: The body's immune and detoxification systems need enough protein in order to work properly. People with compromised livers need more protein.
  • Limit fat intake, and eat the right fats: A high-fat diet might increase the risk of cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Reduce trans fats (hydrogenated oils) and omega-6 fats (safflower oil, sunflower oil, corn oil) and emphasize monounsaturated fats (olive oil, peanut oil) and omega-3 fats.
  • Increase fiber: Fiber helps remove toxins from the gut, relieving some of the burden on the liver. Get more fiber by increasing consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and possibly supplement with soluble fiber such as psyllium or chia.

In managing hepatitis, it is important to alleviate the toxic load on the liver. In addition to the above, you can also1:

  • Avoid alcohol
  • Consume more high-quality, organic foods, as minimally processed as possible
  • Avoid non-essential drugs and supplements
  • Reduce your exposure to toxins in the environment (such as pesticides) and your workplace (such as chemicals and fumes)

Some supplements may be helpful treatments for hepatitis:

Note: Even natural products have the potential to harm the liver. Consult with your doctor before beginning treatment with any new herb or supplement.

... (more)

A number of herbal and botanical supplements may help treat and/or alleviate some of the symptoms of hepatitis. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine has a number of treatments for hepatitis because hepatitis has long been common in China.

Many Ayurvedic herbs and combination therapies may also be effective:

The following may also be useful:

*Note: * Even natural products have the potential to harm the liver. Consult with your doctor before beginning treatment with any new herb or supplement.

... (more)

A number of herbal and botanical supplements may help treat and/or alleviate some of the symptoms of hepatitis. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine has a number of treatments for hepatitis because hepatitis has long been common in China.

Many Ayurvedic herbs and combination therapies may also be effective:

The following may also be useful:

Note: Even natural products have the potential to harm the liver. Consult with your doctor before beginning treatment with any new herb or supplement.

... (more)

Living with hepatitis can be stressful and lead to depression and problems in many facets of your life. Do whatever you can to improve your support system of family, friends and community. Consider seeing a counselor or therapist and attending support groups for people with hepatitis or other chronic diseases.

... (more)

In the management of hepatitis, preventing further damage to the liver is very important. Supporting the liver's functions is also important. There are a number of things you can do to alleviate some of the symptoms and consequences of viral hepatitis.

  • Exercise regularly: Exercise has a number of benefits for people with hepatitis.
  • Avoid smoke and tobacco products, which expose the body to toxins. For information on quitting smoking, as well as practical tips, see the smoking cessation article.
  • Reduce or eliminate your use of unnecessary supplements and medicines, including over-the-counter products such as acetaminophen. Talk to your doctor before starting to take any new medicine or supplement, including natural supplements and herbs.
... (more)

In the management of hepatitis, preventing further damage to the liver is very important. Supporting the liver's functions is also important. There are a number of things you can do to alleviate some of the symptoms and consequences of viral hepatitis.

  • Exercise regularly: Exercise has a number of benefits for people with hepatitis.
  • Avoid smoke and tobacco products, which expose the body to toxins. For information on quitting smoking, as well as practical tips, see the smoking cessation article.
  • Reduce or eliminate your use of unnecessary supplements and medicines, including over-the-counter products such as acetaminophen. Talk to your doctor before starting to take any new medicine or supplement, including natural supplements and herbs.
... (more)
  1. Rakel, D. (2007). Integrative Medicine (2nd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier.
... (more)
  • MD
  • Personal trainer
  • Yoga therapist
  • Your dog
  • And many more...
... (more)

Safe, regular exercise is most beneficial. Increasing your level of physical activity in any way--even by doing a little more of your daily activities--is better than a sedentary lifestyle. For more information and helpful tips, see the "Regular Exercise: How to Get Started" section of the exercise article.

... (more)

Exercise has been shown to1:

  • Decrease fatigue
  • Boost immune response
  • Improve the liver's blood flow
  • Alleviate depression
... (more)

Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It is particularly important for people which health challenges such as hepatitis.

... (more)

Exercise offers a number of benefits for people with hepatitis, including increasing energy, improving immunity, and reducing depression.

... (more)

Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It is particularly important for people which health challenges such as hepatitis.

... (more)

In the management of hepatitis, preventing further damage to the liver is very important. Supporting the liver's functions is also important. There are a number of things you can do to alleviate some of the symptoms and consequences of viral hepatitis.

  • Exercise regularly: Exercise has a number of benefits for people with hepatitis.
  • Avoid smoke and tobacco products, which expose the body to toxins. For information on quitting smoking, as well as practical tips, see the smoking cessation article.
  • Reduce or eliminate your use of unnecessary supplements and medicines, including over-the-counter products such as acetaminophen. Talk to your doctor before starting to take any new medicine or supplement, including natural supplements and herbs.
... (more)

The following dietary guidelines1 are recommended for people with chronic hepatitis:

  • Consume more cruciferous vegetables: In addition to containing many vitamins and minerals, these vegetables have phytochemicals that assist the body in its detoxification processes. Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower, kale, collard greens, and turnips, among many others. Eat them raw or lightly cooked to maintain their health properties.
  • Consume more fruit: Like cruciferous vegetables, many fruits contain a variety of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals that help the liver detoxify. Focus especially on nutrient-dense berries (blueberries, cranberries, etc.), citrus fruits (oranges, lemons, etc.) as well as melons, mangoes and peaches. As with vegetables, fruits lose some of their health properties in cooking, so aim for more fresh or lightly cooked fruits.
  • Avoid or limit consumption of foods that contain substances that block detoxification: These foods include grapefruit (naringenin), hot peppers (capsaicin), onions (quercetin), and clove oil (eugenol).
  • Eat enough protein: The body's immune and detoxification systems need enough protein in order to work properly. People with compromised livers need more protein.
  • Limit fat intake, and eat the right fats: A high-fat diet might increase the risk of cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Reduce trans fats (hydrogenated oils) and omega-6 fats (safflower oil, sunflower oil, corn oil) and emphasize monounsaturated fats (olive oil, peanut oil) and omega-3 fats.
  • Increase fiber: Fiber helps remove toxins from the gut, relieving some of the burden on the liver. Get more fiber by increasing consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and possibly supplement with soluble fiber such as psyllium or chia.

In managing hepatitis, it is important to alleviate the toxic load on the liver. In addition to the above, you can also1:

  • Avoid alcohol
  • Consume more high-quality, organic foods, as minimally processed as possible
  • Avoid non-essential drugs and supplements
  • Reduce your exposure to toxins in the environment (such as pesticides) and your workplace (such as chemicals and fumes)

Some supplements may be helpful treatments for hepatitis:

Note: Even natural products have the potential to harm the liver. Consult with your doctor before beginning treatment with any new herb or supplement.

... (more)

A number of herbal and botanical supplements may help treat and/or alleviate some of the symptoms of hepatitis. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine has a number of treatments for hepatitis because hepatitis has long been common in China.

Many Ayurvedic herbs and combination therapies may also be effective:

The following may also be useful:

Note: Even natural products have the potential to harm the liver. Consult with your doctor before beginning treatment with any new herb or supplement.

... (more)

Many natural products have the capacity to harm the liver. Furthermore, due to the generally inadequate regulation of dietary supplements that exists at the time of this writing, there are real risks that herbal products, at least, may contain liver-toxic contaminants even if the actual herbs listed on the label are safe. For this reason, we recommend that people with liver disease do not use any medicinal herbs except under the supervision of a physician. Here, we list some specific information to aid in your decision-making process.

All forms of vitamin B3 may damage the liver when taken in high doses, including niacin, niacinamide (nicotinamide), and inositol hexaniacinate. (Nutritional supplementation at the standard daily requirement level should not cause a problem.)

Some supplements have known or suspected liver-toxic properties, including germanium (a mineral) and minerals used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Blue-green algae species such as spirulina may at times be contaminated with liver-toxic substances called microcystins, for which no highest safe level is known.

... (more)

The following dietary guidelines1 are recommended for people with chronic hepatitis:

  • Consume more cruciferous vegetables: In addition to containing many vitamins and minerals, these vegetables have phytochemicals that assist the body in its detoxification processes. Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower, kale, collard greens, and turnips, among many others. Eat them raw or lightly cooked to maintain their health properties.
  • Consume more fruit: Like cruciferous vegetables, many fruits contain a variety of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals that help the liver detoxify. Focus especially on nutrient-dense berries (blueberries, cranberries, etc.), citrus fruits (oranges, lemons, etc.) as well as melons, mangoes and peaches. As with vegetables, fruits lose some of their health properties in cooking, so aim for more fresh or lightly cooked fruits.
  • Avoid or limit intake consumption of foods that contain substances that block detoxification: These foods include grapefruit (naringenin), hot peppers (capsaicin), onions (quercetin), and clove oil (eugenol).
  • Eat enough protein: The body's immune and detoxification systems need enough protein in order to work properly. People with compromised livers need more protein.
  • Limit fat intake, and eat the right fats: A high-fat diet might increase the risk of cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Reduce trans fats (hydrogenated oils) and omega-6 fats (safflower oil, sunflower oil, corn oil) and emphasize monounsaturated fats (olive oil, peanut oil) and omega-3 fats.
  • Increase fiber: Fiber helps remove toxins from the gut, relieving some of the burden on the liver. Get more fiber by increasing consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and possibly supplement with soluble fiber such as psyllium or chia.

In managing hepatitis, it is important to alleviate the toxic load on the liver. In addition to the above, you can also1:

  • Avoid alcohol
  • Consume more high-quality, organic foods, as minimally processed as possible
  • Avoid non-essential drugs and supplements
  • Reduce your exposure to toxins in the environment (such as pesticides) and your workplace (such as chemicals and fumes)

Some supplements may be helpful treatments for hepatitis:

Note: Even natural products have the potential to harm the liver. Consult with your doctor before beginning treatment with any new herb or supplement.

... (more)
  1. Rakel, D. (2007). Integrative Medicine (2nd Ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier.
... (more)

The following dietary guidelines1 are recommended for people with chronic hepatitis:

  • Consume more cruciferous vegetables: In addition to containing many vitamins and minerals, these vegetables have phytochemicals that assist the body in its detoxification processes. Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower, kale, collard greens, and turnips, among many others. Eat them raw or lightly cooked to maintain their health properties.
  • Consume more fruit: Like cruciferous vegetables, many fruits contain a variety of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals that help the liver detoxify. Focus especially on nutrient-dense berries (blueberries, cranberries, etc.), citrus fruits (oranges, lemons, etc.) as well as melons, mangoes and peaches. As with vegetables, fruits lose some of their health properties in cooking, so aim for more fresh or lightly cooked fruits.
  • Avoid or limit consumption of foods that contain substances that block detoxification: These foods include grapefruit (naringenin), hot peppers (capsaicin), onions (quercetin), and clove oil (eugenol).
  • Eat enough protein: The body's immune and detoxification systems need enough protein in order to work properly. People with compromised livers need more protein.
  • Limit fat intake, and eat the right fats: A high-fat diet might increase the risk of cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Reduce trans fats (hydrogenated oils) and omega-6 fats (safflower oil, sunflower oil, corn oil) and emphasize monounsaturated fats (olive oil, peanut oil) and omega-3 fats.
  • Increase fiber: Fiber helps remove toxins from the gut, relieving some of the burden on the liver. Get more fiber by increasing consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and possibly supplement with soluble fiber such as psyllium or chia.

In managing hepatitis, it is important to alleviate the toxic load on the liver. In addition to the above, you can also1:

  • Avoid alcohol
  • Consume more high-quality, organic foods, as minimally processed as possible
  • Avoid non-essential drugs and supplements
  • Reduce your exposure to toxins in the environment (such as pesticides) and your workplace (such as chemicals and fumes)

Some supplements may be helpful treatments for hepatitis:

Note: Even natural products have the potential to harm the liver. Consult with your doctor before beginning treatment with any new herb or supplement.

... (more)