Intubation and Mechanical Ventilation
What is it? Overview Usage Side Effects and Warnings
Answers

What is Intubation and Mechanical Ventilation?

Intubation and mechanical ventilation is the use of a tube and a machine to help get air into and out of your lungs. This is often done in emergencies, but it can also be done when you are having surgery.

Endotracheal Intubation
Endotracheal Intubation
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Your lungs help exchange gases in your body. Oxygen gets moved from the air in your lungs into your blood, and carbon dioxide in your blood moves into the air in your lungs. This movement of gases is needed to live. If you cannot move air into and out of your lungs, then this gas exchange cannot happen. Intubation and mechanical ventilation is done to help you breathe when you cannot move enough air in and out on your own.

Possible Complications

Complications are rare, but no procedure is completely free of risk. If you are planning to have intubation and mechanical ventilation, your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:

  • Damage to teeth, lips, or tongue
  • Damage to trachea (windpipe), resulting in pain, hoarseness, and sometimes difficulty breathing after the tube is removed
  • Esophageal intubation (when the tube is accidentally inserted into the esophagus and stomach rather than the trachea)
  • Low blood pressure
  • Pneumonia
  • Lung injury
  • Infection

Some factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

  • Neck or cervical spine injury
  • Pre-existing lung disease (eg, emphysema )
  • Poor condition of teeth
  • Recent meal *...
 
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