Lymph Node Biopsy
What is it? Overview Usage Side Effects and Warnings
Answers

What is Lymph Node Biopsy?

Lymph nodes are found throughout the body. They are part of the body’s immune system. These nodes help fight infection by producing special white blood cells. They also work by trapping bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells. Normally, lymph nodes cannot be felt unless they are swollen. Infection, usually by a virus, is the most common cause of lymph node swelling. Other causes include inflammatory diseases, abscesses, and cancer.

With this type of biopsy, the doctor removes and examines all or part of a lymph node.

This biopsy is done to find out why a node is swollen. It can also be done to see if there are cancer cells in the lymph node.

Common areas for biopsy include:

  • Groin
  • Armpit
  • Neck
  • Under the jaw and chin
  • Behind the ears

Possible Complications

Complications are rare, but no procedure is completely free of risk. If you are planning to have a lymph node biopsy, your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Nerve damage (including numbness at the biopsy site)

Call Your Doctor

After arriving home, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

  • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
  • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or any discharge from the incision site
  • New or worsening symptoms

In case of an emergency, CALL 911.

 
Share