Noni
What is it? Overview Usage Side Effects and Warnings
Answers

What is Noni?

Morinda citrifolia, also known as noni or Indian mulberry, is a small evergreen shrub or tree of the plant family Rubiaceae. Native to the Pacific islands, Polynesia, Asia, and Australia, it grows up to 10 feet high. The leaves are 8 or more inches long, dark green, oval shaped, and shiny, with deep veins. The flower heads are about an inch long and bear many small white flowers. These heads grow to become the mature fruit, 3 to 4 inches in diameter with a warty, pitted surface. Noni fruit starts out green, turns yellow with ripening, and has a foul odor, especially as it ripens to whiteness and falls to the ground.

Some cultures may eat noni fruit in times of scarcity (the unripened fruit is less noxious). Traditional Polynesian healers have apparently used the fruit for many...

Noni has been heavily promoted for an enormous range of uses, including: abrasions, arthritis, atherosclerosis, bladder infections, boils, bowel disorders, burns, cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome, circulatory weakness, colds, cold sores, congestion, constipation, diabetes, drug addiction, eye inflammations, fever, fractures, gastric ulcers, gingivitis, headaches, heart disease, hypertension, improved digestion, immune weakness, indigestion, intestinal parasites, kidney disease, malaria, menstrual cramps, menstrual irregularities, mouth sores, respiratory disorders, ringworm, sinusitis, skin inflammation, sprains, stroke, thrush, and wounds. 1 However, there is no real evidence that it is effective for any of these conditions.

Several animal studies have evaluated the effects of...

Safety Issues

Although use of noni is not commonly associated with side effects, comprehensive safety studies have not been performed. A small number of case reports hint that, in rare cases, use of noni might cause severe liver damage, potentially leading to a need for liver transplant. 2 The risk is believed to be very low, however, if it exists at all. 3 Nonetheless, people with liver disease, or who take medications that can harm the liver, or who consume alcohol to excess should not use noni. Maximum safe doses in young children or pregnant or nursing women remains unclear.

 
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