Ornithine Alpha-Ketoglutarate
What is it? Overview Usage Side Effects and Warnings
Answers

What is Ornithine Alpha-Ketoglutarate?

Ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate (OKG) is manufactured from two amino acids, ornithine and glutamine. These amino acids are called “conditionally essential.” This means that ordinarily one does not need to consume them in food because the body can manufacture them from other nutrients. However, during periods of severe stress, such as recovery from major trauma or severe illness, the body may not be able to manufacture them in sufficient quantities, and may require an external source.

Ornithine and glutamine are thought to have anabolic effects, meaning that they stimulate the body to build muscle and other tissues. These amino acids also appear to have anti-catabolic effects. This is a closely related but slightly different property; ornithine and glutamine appear to block the effect...

OKG may play a role in the treatment of individuals recovering from severe physical trauma.

When the body experiences severe trauma—such as injury, major surgery , or burns—it goes into what is called a catabolic state.In this temporary condition, the body tends to tear itself down rather than build itself up. The catabolic hormone cortisone plays a major role in inducing catabolism. In the catabolic state, the body fails to utilize protein found in the diet, and high levels of protein breakdown products appear in the urine. Calcium levels in urine also rise, as bones begin to weaken.

The opposite of a catabolic state is an anabolic state,in which the body tends to build itself up. Studies of hospitalized patients recovering from severe illnesses or injuries suggest that OKG...

Safety Issues

Because it is simply ornithine and glutamine, OKG is presumably safe. However, high doses (over 5 to10 g) can cause diarrhea and stomach cramps. The maximum safe dosages for young children, women who are pregnant or nursing, or those with serious liver or kidney disease have not been established.

 
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