Oxerutins
What is it? Overview Usage Side Effects and Warnings
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Oxerutins Usage

Written by FoundHealth.

Therapeutic Uses

Varicose means enlarged or distended. A varicose vein is abnormally enlarged, allowing blood to pool and stagnate instead of moving it efficiently toward the heart. Surface veins of the leg are those most vulnerable to becoming varicose. Venous insufficiency is a closely related condition affecting larger veins deep within the leg. In either case, blood pools within the vein and exerts pressure against the vein walls and capillaries, resulting in pain, aching, swelling, and feelings of heaviness and fatigue. In addition, varicose veins present a cosmetic problem: bulging, often ropy, blue or purple lines visible on the skin of the lower legs.

Strong evidence shows that oxerutins can be helpful for venous insufficiency/varicose veins, improving aching, swelling, and fatigue in the legs. 1 Mixed evidence suggests that oxerutins might also be helpful for the leg ulcers that can develop in venous insufficiency. 2 3 There is no evidence as yet that oxerutins can improve the cosmetic appearance of varicose veins.

Oxerutins have also been found effective for treating varicose veins when they occur during pregnancy . 4

Hemorrhoids are a special type of varicose vein, and oxerutins may be helpful for treating them as well, although there have been some negative studies. 5 Some evidence suggests that oxerutins may be helpful for lymphedema (chronic arm swelling caused by damage to the lymph drainage system) following surgery for breast cancer, 6 7 as well as for edema in the immediate postsurgical period. 8 Preliminary evidence, including small double-blind trials, suggests that oxerutins might also be helpful for reducing lower extremity swelling in people with diabetes. 9 In these trials, oxerutin therapy did not affect blood sugar control.

One small double-blind study suggests oxerutins may be helpful for reducing vertigo and other symptoms of Meniere's disease. 10 This use is based on a theory that Meniere’s disease is caused by excessive fluid leaking from capillaries in the inner ear.

References

  1. MacLennan WJ, Wilson J, Rattenhuber V, Dikland WJ, Vanderdonckt J, Moriau M. Hydroxyethylrutosides in elderly patients with chronic venous insufficiency: its efficacy and tolerability. Gerontology. 40(1):45-52.
  2. Stegmann W, Hubner K, Deichmann B, et al. The efficacy of O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides in the treatment of venous leg ulcers [in French]. Phlebologie. 1987;40:149-156.
  3. Wadworth AN, Faulds D. Hydroxyethylrutosides. A review of its pharmacology, and therapeutic efficacy in venous insufficiency and related disorders. Drugs. 44(6):1013-32.
  4. Sohn C, Jahnichen C, Bastert G. Effectiveness of beta-hydroxyethylrutoside in patients with varicose veins in pregnancy [in German]. Zentralbl Gynakol. 1995;117:190-197.
  5. Wijayanegara H, Mose JC, Achmad L, Sobarna R, Permadi W. A clinical trial of hydroxyethylrutosides in the treatment of haemorrhoids of pregnancy. J Int Med Res. 20(1):54-60.
  6. Taylor HM, Rose KE, Twycross RG. A double-blind clinical trial of hydroxyethylrutosides in obstructive arm lymphoedema. Phlebologie. 1993;(suppl 1):22-28.
  7. Mortimer PS, Badger C, Clarke I, et al. A double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of O-(beta-Hydroxyethyl)-Rutosides in chronic arm oedema resulting from breast cancer treatment. Phlebologie. 1995;10:51-55.
  8. Fassina A, Rubinacci A. Post-traumatic oedemas. A controlled study into the activity of hydroxyethylrutoside [translated from Italian]. Gazz Med Ital Arch Sci. 1987;146:103-109.
  9. Wadworth AN, Faulds D. Hydroxyethylrutosides. A review of its pharmacology, and therapeutic efficacy in venous insufficiency and related disorders. Drugs. 44(6):1013-32.
  10. Moser M, Ranacher G, Wilmot TJ, Golden GJ. A double-blind clinical trial of hydroxyethylrutosides in Menière's disease. J Laryngol Otol. 98(3):265-72.
 
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