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Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and Metformin

Read more about Metformin.

Overview

This drug is used to increase insulin sensitivity and was initially developed for diabetics.

Effect of Metformin on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

The most common medical treatment for PCOS is Metformin. In increasing insulin sensitivity in women with PCOS, metformin actually aids the body in regulating its cycle. It also acts as an aid to weightloss in overweight and obese women with PCOS.

Side Effects and Warnings

#What are the precautions when taking this medicine?

• Wear disease medical alert identification.

• You should stop this medicine for 2 days after an x-ray with dye.

• Use caution if you are having surgery, if you have a heart attack, severe infection, or stroke, or if you are 80 years of age or older and have not had your kidney function tested.

• If you have lung disease, talk with healthcare provider.

• If you have a weakened heart, talk with healthcare provider.

• Do not drive if blood sugar has been low. There is a greater risk of an accident.

• Check medicines with healthcare provider. This medicine may not mix well with other medicines.

• Avoid alcohol (includes wine, beer, and liquor).

• Tell healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant.

• Tell healthcare provider if you are breast-feeding.

#What are some possible side effects of this medicine?

• Low blood sugar. Signs include anger, shaking, fast heartbeat, confusion, or sweating. Keep hard candies, glucose tablets, liquid glucose, or juice on hand for low blood sugar.

• Belly pain.

• Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

• Diarrhea.

• Not hungry.

• Abnormal taste. This is usually reversible.

• Blood acidity (lactic acidosis) may rarely occur.

#Reasons to call healthcare provider immediately

• If you suspect an overdose, call your local poison control center or emergency department immediately.

• Signs of a life-threatening reaction. These include wheezing; chest tightness; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; fits; or swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat.

• Very low blood sugar or very high blood sugar.

• Severe dizziness.

• Difficulty breathing.

• Feeling cold.

• Severe belly pain.

• Severe nausea or vomiting.

• Severe diarrhea.

• Severe muscle pain or weakness.

• Feeling extremely tired or weak.

• Any rash.

• No improvement in condition or feeling worse.

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