Wormwood
What is it? Overview Usage Side Effects and Warnings
Answers
askAsk

Wormwood Usage

Written by FoundHealth.

3 people have experienced Wormwood. Have you?

I'm a professional and
3 people have tried Wormwood 0 people have prescribed Wormwood

What Is Wormwood Used for Today?

Wormwood is sometimes recommended today for the treatment of digestive conditions such as intestinal parasites, dyspepsia , esophageal reflux , and irritable bowel syndrome . However, there is no meaningful evidence to indicate that it is effective for any of these conditions. Only double-blind , placebo-controlled studies can show a treatment effective, and only one has been performed using wormwood. (For information on why such studies are essential, see Why Does This Database Rely on Double-blind Studies? )

This 10 week study conducted in Germany evaluated the potential benefits of wormwood for treatment of people with Crohn’s disease , an inflammatory condition of the intestines. 1 All forty people enrolled in the study had achieved good control of their symptoms through use of steroids and other medications. Half were given an herbal blend containing wormwood (500 mg three time daily) while the other half were given an identical-appearing placebo. Both researchers and study participants were kept in the dark regarding who was receiving real treatment and who was not. Beginning at week 2, researchers began a gradual tapering down of the steroid dosage used by participants. Over subsequent weeks, most of those given placebo showed the expected worsening of symptoms that the reduction of drug dosage would be expected to cause. In contrast, most of those receiving wormwood showed a gradual improvement of symptoms. No serious side effects were attributed to wormwood in this study.

These are extremely promising findings. However, it must be kept in mind that a great many treatments that show promise in a single study fail to hold up in subsequent independent testing. Further research will be needed to establish wormwood as a helpful treatment for Crohn’s disease. Other proposed uses of wormwood have far weaker supporting evidence. Extremely preliminary indications hint

Other proposed uses of wormwood have far weaker supporting evidence. Extremely preliminary indications hint that wormwood essential oil (like many other essential oils) might have antifungal, antibacterial, and antiparasitic actions. 2 3 4 5 Note, however, that is does not mean that wormwood oil is an antibiotic. Antibiotics are substances that can be taken internally to kill microorganisms throughout the body. Wormwood oil, rather, has shown potential antiseptic properties. Unfortunately, it is also potentially quite toxic. (See Safety Issues .)

Other weak evidence hints that an alcohol extract of wormwood might have liver-protective actions. 6

References

  1. Omer B, Krebs S, Omer H, et. al. Steroid-sparing effect of wormwood ( Artemisia absinthium ) in Crohn's disease: a double-blind placebo-controlled study. Phytomedicine. 2007;14:87-95
  2. Kordali S, Cakir A, Mavi A, Kilic H, Yildirim A. Screening of chemical composition and antifungal and antioxidant activities of the essential oils from three Turkish artemisia species. J Agric Food Chem. 53(5):1408-16.
  3. Juteau F, Jerkovic I, Masotti V, et al. Composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Artemisiaabsinthium from Croatia and France. Planta Med. 2003;69:158–61.
  4. Alzoreky NS, Nakahara K. Antibacterial activity of extracts from some edible plants commonly consumed in Asia. Int J Food Microbiol. 80(3):223-30.
  5. Chiasson H, Belanger A, Bostanian N, et al. Acaricidal properties of Artemisia absinthium and Tanacetumvulgare (Asteraceae) essential oils obtained by three methods of extraction. J Econ Entomol. 2001;94:167–71.
  6. Gilani AH, Janbaz KH. Preventive and curative effects of Artemisia absinthium on acetaminophen and CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. Gen Pharmacol. 1995;26:309–15.
 
Share

0 Comments

No one has made any comments yet. Be the first!

Your Comment