Botulinum Toxin Injections—Cosmetic
What is it? Overview Usage Side Effects and Warnings
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Botulinum Toxin Injections—Cosmetic Overview

Written by FoundHealth.

Definition

Botulinum toxin is made from a type of bacteria. It is toxic to the nerves. Another name for it is bacterial neurotoxin. An injection puts this toxin into muscle. There, it blocks the chemical signal from the nerves to muscles. This will decrease the muscle contraction (tightening).

There are several types and brands of this toxin. Examples include Botox, Dysport, and Reloxin, which are formulations of botulinum toxin type A. Myobloc is another brand, but it is a formulation of botulinum toxin type B. These products are used for cosmetic and medical reasons.

This injection process is often called botox injection, although any brand of the botulinum toxin may be used.

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What to Expect

Anesthesia

Most often, none is given. Some patients may prefer to have the area numbed for comfort. In this case, a topical anesthetic may be used.

Description of the Procedure

A thin needle will be used. The doctor will inject the toxin through the skin into the targeted muscle. You will often need several injections in a small area.

After Procedure

There is very little recovery needed, but remember to:

  • Remain upright for several hours
  • Avoid alcohol

How Long Will It Take?

The length will depend on the number of sites involved. It is often less than 20 minutes.

Will It Hurt?

You may have some minimal discomfort.

Post-procedure Care

Normal activities may be resumed after the procedure. For the best recovery, follow your doctor's instructions .

The toxin temporarily weakens targeted muscles. The treatment lasts up to four months. With repeated use, the effects may last longer.

References

RESOURCES:

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery
http://www.asds-net.org/

American Society of Plastic Surgeons
http://www.plasticsurgery.org/

CANADIAN RESOURCES:

Canadian Dermatology Association
http://www.dermatology.ca/

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/

References:

Allergan Physician Production Information. Botox cosmetic (botulinum toxin type A). Published April 2008.

Baran R, Maibach H. Textbook of Cosmetic Dermatology. 3rd ed. New York, NY: Taylor and Francis; 2004.

Conn HF, Rakel R. Conn’s Current Therapy.54th ed. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders Company; 2002.

Habif T. Clinical Dermatology. 4th ed. St. Louis, MO: Mosby; 2004.

Ondo WG, Gollomp S, Galvez-Jimenez N. A pilot study of botulinum toxin A for headache in cervical dystonia. Headache. 2005;45(8):1073-1077.

Ward A, Roberts G, Warner J, et al. Cost-effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of post-stroke spasticity. J Rehabil Med. 2005;37(4):252-257.

11/4/2009 DynaMed Systematic Literature Surveillance DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance : FDA gives update on botulinum toxin safety warnings. US Food and Drug Administration website. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm175013.htm . Updated August 3, 2009. Accessed November 4, 2009.

 
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