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Dr. Karri Cardinal

Dr. Karri Cardinal

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Expertise
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About Me

Visit my website at http://www.DrCardinal.com

I have been practicing chiropractic in downtown San Francisco since 1999. With experience and an open mind, I am committed to promoting the health and well being of my patients.

I am certified in an advanced spinal correction technique called Clinical Biomechanics of Posture (also known as Chiropractic Biophysics or CBP). CBP is "state of the art," having more published research than any other chiropractic technique. I am one of three chiropractors in San Francisco trained to do CBP and the only one with advanced certification.

I graduated magma cum lade from Life Chiropractic College West in 1998. While at Life West, I was the first female president of the CBP club. As the club president, I taught other chiropractic students the theory and application of CBP. I earned the “Commitment to Excellence Award” in 1997 for this achievement.

I also taught CBP and Advanced CBP at Life Chiropractic College West (2006 to 2009) and Palmer West (2003 to 2005) at the direct request of Dr. Don Harrison and Dr. Deed Harrison. For this I was awarded the “Chiropractic Biophysics Outstanding Achievement Award” in 2006.

My hobbies include reading, hiking, karate, and playing with my young son, Jacob.
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None 40 expertise • 2 contributions

Chiropractic 20 expertise • 1 contribution

Posture caregiver • 20 expertise • 1 contribution
"Posture affects and moderates every physiologic function from breathing to hormonal production. Spinal pain, headache, mood, blood pressure, pulse and lung capacity are among the functions most easily influenced by posture." Journal of Pain Management, 1994



Good Posture is Good Health Posture ranks right up at the top of the list when you are talking about good health. It is as important as eating right, exercising, getting a good night's sleep and avoiding potentially harmful substances like alcohol, drugs and tobacco. Good posture is a way of doing things with more energy, less stress and fatigue. Good posture means your bones are properly aligned and your muscles, joints, and ligaments can work as nature intended. It also means your vital organs are in the right position and can function at peak efficiency. Good posture helps contribute to the normal functioning of the nervous system.

Without good posture, your overall health and total efficiency may be compromised. Because the long-term effects of poor posture can affect bodily systems (such as digestion, elimination, breathing, muscles, joints and ligaments), a person who has poor posture may often be tired or unable to work efficiently or move properly. The good news is that most everyone can avoid the problems caused by bad posture... and you can make improvements at any age.


Poor Posture - How Does it Happen?

Often, poor posture develops because of accidents or falls. But bad posture can also develop from environmental factors or bad habits. This means that you have control.

In most cases, poor posture results from a combination of several factors, which can include:

1. Accidents, injuries and falls

2. Poor sleep support (mattress)

3. Excessive weight

4. Visual or emotional difficulties

5. Foot problems or improper shoes

6. Weak muscles, muscle imbalance

7. Careless sitting, standing, sleeping habits

8. Negative self image

9. Occupational stress

10. Poorly designed work space



Poor Posture & Pain - A lifetime of poor posture can start a progression of symptoms in the average adult. It can start with;



Fatigue - Your muscles have to work hard just to hold you up if you have poor posture. You waste energy just moving, leaving you without the extra energy you need to feel good.

Tight, achy muscles in the neck, back, arms and legs - By this stage, there may be a change in your muscles and ligaments and you may have a stiff, tight painful feeling. More than 80% of the neck and back problems are the result of tight, achy muscles brought on by years of bad posture.

Joint stiffness and pain - At risk for "wear and tear" arthritis, or what is termed degenerative osteoarthritis. Poor posture and limited mobility increase the likelihood of this condition in later years.


Common symptoms of poor posture include headaches, neck pain, arthritis, muscle strain, muscle spasms, pinched nerves, disc injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, thoracic outlet syndrome, TMJ, fibromyalgia, fatigue, numbness or tingling in hands/legs, and low back pain.
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Back Pain Care giver • 0 contributions
Eighty percent of people suffer from back pain at some point in their lives. Back pain is the second most common reason for visits to the doctor's office, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. In fact, it is estimated that low back pain affects more than half of the adult population each year and more than 10% of all people experience frequent bouts of low back pain.

The susceptibility of the low back to injury and pain is due to the fact that the low back, like the neck, is a very unstable part of the spine. Unlike the thoracic spine, which is supported and stabilized by the rib cage. This instability allows us to have a great deal of mobility to touch our toes, tie our shoes or pick something up from the ground, but at the cost of increased risk of injury.

As long as it is healthy and functioning correctly, the low back can withstand tremendous forces without injury. Professional powerlifters can pick up several hundred pounds off the floor without injuring their low back. However, if the low back is out of adjustment or has weakened supporting muscles, something as simple as taking a bag of groceries out of the trunk of their car, picking something up off the floor, or even simply bending down to pet the cat can cause a low back injury.

Until recently, researchers believed that back pain would heal on its own. We have learned, however, that this is not true. Recent studies showed that when back pain is not treated, it may go away temporarily, but will most likely return. It is important to take low back pain seriously and seek professional chiropractic care. This is especially true with pain that recurs over and over again. Contact our chiropractor . . . we can help!

The Causes of Low Back Pain
There are many different conditions that can result in low back pain, including: sprained ligaments, strained muscles, ruptured disks, trigger points and inflamed joints. While sports injuries or accidents can lead to injury and pain, sometimes even the simplest movements, like picking up a pencil from the floor, can have painful results. In addition, conditions such as arthritis, poor posture, obesity, psychological stress and even kidney stones, kidney infections, blood clots, or bone loss can lead to pain.

Due to the fact that there are a whole lot of things that can cause low back pain, and some of those things can be quite serious if left untreated, it is important to seek professional help. Chiropractors are the experts at diagnosing the cause and determining the proper treatment for low back pain. Here are some of the most common causes I see:

Subluxations
Whenever there is a disruption in the normal movement or position of the vertebrae, the result is pain and inflammation. In the lumbar spine, these usually occur at the transition between the lower spine and the sacrum. Subluxations can lead to debilitating low back pain. Fortunately, subluxations are easily treatable and often times a significant reduction in pain is experienced almost immediately after treatment.

Disc Herniations
Contrary to popular belief, a herniated disc does not automatically mean that you are going to suffer from low back pain. In fact, one study found that almost half of all adults had at least one bulging or herniated disc, even though they did not suffer any back pain from it. On the other hand, herniated discs can be a source of intense and debilitating pain that frequently radiates to other areas of the body. Unfortunately, once a disc herniates, they rarely, if ever, completely heal. Further deterioration can often be avoided through regular chiropractic care, but a complete recovery is much less common.

Sprains, Strains and Spasms
This is commonly the source of low back pain among the weekend warriors. You know, the type who have very little physical activity during the week, but once the weekend arrives, they push themselves way too much. By the end of the weekend, they are lying flat on their back counting down the hours before they can get in to see their chiropractor. Overworking the muscles or ligaments of the low back can lead to small tears in the tissues, which then become painful, swollen and tight.

Stress
Whenever you become stressed, your body responds by increasing your blood pressure and heart rate, flooding your body with stress hormones and tightening up your muscles. When you are stressed all the time, the chronic tension causes your muscles to become sore, weak and loaded with trigger points. If you are stressed out all of the time and you have low back pain, it is important to do some relaxation exercises, such as deep breathing, as well as to get regular exercise.

Treating Low Back Pain With Chiropractic
Chiropractic treatment for low back pain is usually pretty straightforward. Most commonly, it's simply a matter of adjusting the lower lumbar vertebrae and pelvis to re-establish normal motion and position of your bones and joints.

Chiropractic for the low back has been repeatedly shown to be the most effective treatment for low back pain. In fact, major studies have shown that chiropractic care is more effective, cheaper and has better long-term outcomes than any other treatment. This makes sense because chiropractic care is the only method of treatment that serves to re-establish normal vertebral motion and position in the spine. All other treatments, such as muscle relaxants, pain killers and bed rest, only serve to decrease the symptoms of the problem and do not correct the problem itself.
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