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Fundoplication—Laparoscopic Surgery
What is it? Overview Usage Side Effects and Warnings
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Fundoplication—Laparoscopic Surgery Overview

Written by FoundHealth.

Definition

Fundoplication is a surgery on the stomach and esophagus. It is done to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD is also called acid reflux, or heartburn. This occurs when acid from the stomach goes up the esophagus. A hiatal hernia may also be fixed during this procedure. This type of hernia occurs when a portion of the stomach pokes into the chest cavity. This hernia increases the chance and severity of GERD.

Fundoplication
Fundoplication
2009 Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

What to Expect

Prior to Procedure

Your doctor may do the following:

  • Physical exam
  • X-ray —a test that uses radiation to take a picture of structures inside the body, especially bones
  • Endoscopy —use of a tube attached to a viewing device (an endoscope) to examine the inside of the lining of the esophagus and stomach; a biopsy may also be taken
  • Manometry—a test to measure the muscular contractions inside the esophagus and its response to swallowing

Leading up to the surgery:

  • Talk to your doctor about your medicines. You may be asked to stop taking some medicines up to one week before the procedure, like:
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs (eg, aspirin )
  • Blood thinners, like warfarin (Coumadin)
  • Clopidogrel (Plavix)
  • Arrange for a ride to and from the hospital. Also, arrange for help at home.
  • The night before, eat a light meal. Do not eat or drink anything after midnight.

Anesthesia

General anesthesia will be used. It will block any pain and keep you asleep through the surgery.

Description of the Procedure

Laparoscopic Procedure

The doctor will make a small incision. The laparoscope (a small tool with a camera on the end) will be inserted into the abdomen. It will allow the doctor to view the inside of the body on a video screen. Gas will be pumped into the abdomen to improve the view. The doctor will make other, small incisions in the skin. Small surgical instruments will be inserted. The stomach will then be wrapped around the esophagus. If needed, the hernia will be repaired.

In some cases, the doctor may need to switch to an open surgery . He will make a wide incision in the abdomen to do the surgery.

How Long Will It Take?

2-4 hours

How Much Will It Hurt?

You will have discomfort during recovery. Ask your doctor about medicine to help with the pain.

Average Hospital Stay

Two days or more (depending on your condition)

Post-procedure Care

  • Walk with assistance the day after surgery.
  • Keep the incision area clean and dry.
  • You will start by eating a liquid diet. You will slowly be able to eat more solid foods.
  • After a successful fundoplication, you may no longer need to take medicines for GERD.
  • Be sure to follow your doctor's instructions .

It will take about two weeks to recover.

References

RESOURCES:

National Digestive Diseases Clearinghouse
http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/

The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons
http://www.sages.org/

CANADIAN RESOURCES:

The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology
http://www.cag-acg.org/

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/

References:

EsophyX receives FDA clearance for performing transoral incisionless fundoplication surgery. Medical News Today website. Available at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/83410.php . Published September 24, 2007. Accessed August 19, 2009.

Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons website. Available at: http://www.sages.org/ .

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons website. Available at: http://www.sts.org/sections/aboutthesociety/practiceguidelines/antibioticguideline/ .

Transoral incisionless fundoplication with EsophyX. Endogastric Solutions website. Available at: http://www.endogastricsolutions.com/esophyx_for-pt.htm . Accessed August 19, 2009.

Treating GERD. Ohio State University Medical Center website. Available at: http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcareservices/digestivedisorders/gerdheartburn/diagnosingtreatinggerd/treatinggerd/Pages/index.aspx . Accessed August 19, 2009.

 
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